OCA Textiles 3 Sustaining My Practice

Part 4- Continuing Creative Development for the Exhibition

Assignment 4 Review- Initial Exhibition Preparation

Gillian Morris Student No. 511388

Gillian Morris (2021) “I no longer want to live” Mental Health Crisis- A Visual Account of Emotional Distress. 203cm x 274cm Screen-Printed Vintage Linen Bedsheet using intuitive emotional relating with the materials. Various greys, black, sugarplum pink, ruby red and pomegranate printing inks used on vintage dyed grey linen which explored greater emotional arousal.

Exhibition Statement- “Help me as I am struggling to want to be here”

A Series of Material Statements-Visual Representations of Mental Distress and Recovery (2021) is a group of large-scale mixed media works using screen printing and hand stitching on vintage linen bedsheets. The material qualities of the vintage linen bedsheets and threads are indicative of and help to reinforce the narrative, to tell the story of mental crisis through therapy to mental recovery through their strength, resilience, robustness, and enhanced capacity for repair. The work is autobiographical in nature and depicts real-life circumstances emotionally through the textile artists experiences as a psychologist. The scale of intuitive relating with the materials in process communicate the scale of emotional resonance felt within the therapeutic therapy process itself as a psychologist.  Throughout the creative process the textile artist sought to convey her own emotional experiencing, so others can look, to feel to understand something of such experiencing.

The vintage linen bedsheets are imbedded with meaning for the textile artist, of her family’s history based in linen, of a lineage, weighted with provenance, of generations of home and mill workers making linen, of layers of experiencing enmeshed within the material, of personal identity and belonging. The vintage linen bedsheets lent themselves to communicating the narrative, of previous wear and tear, of communicating a range of experiencing through a lifetime and the repetitive need for repair. Of the capacity of the vintage linen bedsheets to encompass pleasant dreams to traumatic nightmares, of bringing comfort, restorative sleep, and relaxation to unravelling despair and spiralling low mood. The aim then is to promote increased insight and understanding of the experiencing of mental distress and of the need for support, compassion, and time, to listen to understand free from labelling, judgement, and recrimination. To help counter the adage man’s inhumanity to man, to afford those struggling with mental ill-health the therapeutic environment to mend and recover. The visual representations from each series of screen-printed imagery with printing inks builds up layers of emotional relating and responding with the vintage linen using colour combinations to best suit the emotional state of either distress or repair. The imagery stemmed from original artwork based upon neural mapping as the basis of all communication and understanding. Ultimately the textile artist sought to express the increased propensity for change, growth, and repair, for positive transformation from mental distress. That said the series invites the viewer to reflect upon mental distress and recovery, of their own emotional response to the sequence and to consider how they can help themselves and others to be more tolerate, understanding, compassionate and kind both self to self and self with other.

The textile artist has utilised ten vintage linen bedsheets as the material basis of the creative work. Each bedsheet was dyed in varying shades of grey to match grey matter which is abundant in the cerebellum, cerebrum and brain stem and represents the core sites of cognitive functioning, information processing through neural connectivity. The original artwork for this project of work stems from research on neuro-networking from neuroimaging techniques to illustrate human identity and the sense of self at its most intrinsic level. Eight vintage linen bedsheets were screen-printed whole, and two bedsheets were cut up and used for the sampling processes through a process of building up layers of print to explore meaning and to demonstrate emotion, one series of three bedsheets represent crisis with print while the other series of five bedsheets represent repair and recovery through print and stitch. The eight whole linen bedsheets are wall mounted as well as hung from the ceiling as a central space to walk through, to fully inhabit to interact with from within the exhibition space.

Gillian Morris   Textile Artist    October 2021

https://weaveprint.com/

Scan QR Code for Exhibition Details

Visual Representations of Mental Distress and Recovery (2021)

Textile Artist Statement-Gillian Morris https://weaveprint.com/

Morris (2021) In Crisis- “Being me is really too hard” Detail from completed screen printed dyed vintage linen bedsheets using intuitive relating with the material through multiple layering effects including various greys, black, sugarplum pink, and increased use of ruby red and pomegranate printing inks on vintage dyed grey linen which visually explored emotional arousal from mental distress.

Making textiles through print, weave and stitch represents much of my creative practice and creative life. I work intuitively with the materials in use to ensure respect for the cloth and the environment, to establish a form of reciprocal relating in action as I create. Given my studio practice is embedded within environmentally supportive ways of making and creating I intuitively react and respond to how the material relates to and with the print, weave, and stitch processes to ensure their qualities are best promoted. I prefer to use reclaimed, repurposed, reused, recycled, and found materials, to promote environmental sustainability with no waste including natural fibres, fabrics, and threads which includes wool, paper, cardboard, MDF, rope, string, cord, cable, and wire. Vintage linen represents one of my favourite materials and threads given its proven sustainability, strength, resilience and capacity for repair and recovery. My family have long had a strong affinity with linen as home and mill workers, so provenance is important to me, of knowing the place of origin or earliest known history of something that I am working with.

As a psychologist and a textile artist I am interested in relating and relationships within material use and throughout my professional work. Given the complexity of human relating I continue to investigate and reflect upon my own emotional reactions in creative process to evoke emotional responses in others when viewing my work.  I like to explore the many effects of layering through print using a range of printmaking techniques and strategies especially screen printing but also ink jet printing, heat transfer printing and relief printmaking, woodcut, linocut, and collagraph. I visually represent relationships within an abstracted contemporary format involving emotional resonance. I work in a larger scale which stems from my own original mixed media artwork including sketching, drawing, and painting with hand printmaking alongside extensive sampling processes to create unique mark making for screen printing and/or stitch/weave. From the initial inspiration through researching my thoughts, and feelings alongside my findings and ideas, my artwork evolves and is translated onto the materials through print, stitch and/or weave as I continue to be open to how I relate with materials as this affects my creative outcomes. I use more of myself emotionally through personal expression to increasingly challenge the status quo, to address and respond to how mental distress is viewed, to raise awareness to generate discussion, to re-evaluate and reinterpret to help foster change in how dysfunction is perceived, to move towards telling a story which can be readily heard and responded to, for the audience to see and understand, to convey something which is important and meaningful through my creative process. The proposed project of work and related exhibition offers a new way of relating with the experience of mental health and ill-health to fully engage emotionally within a more immersive process.

Morris (2021) In Crisis- “Being me is really too hard” Detail from completed screen printed dyed vintage linen bedsheets using intuitive relating with the material through multiple layering effects including various greys, black, sugarplum pink, and increased use of ruby red and pomegranate printing inks on vintage dyed grey linen which visually explored emotional arousal from mental distress.
Exhibition preparation- Art Gallery Labels for each vintage linen screen printed panel on display including the title, material, size, related information and website details for further exhibition information, queries, feedback and contact.
An example of one vintage linen panel prepared for hanging with the completed double 50cm grey dyed cotton herringbone webbing tape attached to the top to create the necessary channel for the wooden dowelling rod to go through. Each end of the dowelling rod was painted white and a hole was drilled through so the fishing line could be inserted through for hanging, to tie round the ceiling exhibition rods. Hooks with the clear fishing line were used for the five panel central installation for ease of hanging as the height from the floor was greater than for the wall hangings.
As part of the exhibition preparation a few sessions were organised to trial hanging the vintage linen panels to ensure the screen printed textiles were presented appropriately and the dowelling rods could suffiently support the weight of the textiles. Given the open ceiling there were numerous options for hanging the panels using the fishing line monofilament which was clear strong nylon wire with abrasion resistance and an increased knot strength.
Wasps Exhibition Space, Artist Studio Complex, Hanson Street, Dennistoun, Glasgow. Central area to be used for hanging the five panel installation to exlemplify mental health recovery and repair
Wasps Exhibition Space, Artist Studio Complex, Hanson Street, Dennistoun, Glasgow. Wall space to be used for the wall hangings including framed examples of some of the samples to help to highlight the creative process.
Wasps Exhibition Space, Artist Studio Complex, Hanson Street, Dennistoun, Glasgow. Start of the Exhibition Preparation to help plan for and to work out the layout of the exhibition and what works best given the exhibition space and the scale of cascading light from the roof and windows.
The start of the preparation stage for one of the vintage linen wall hangings as I carefully rolled up the excess material. Each panel required to be pressed thoroughly with steam to ensure all the creases were removed so the panel would lie flat when hanging. The print table was utilised to press all eight panels and to roll the panels onto plastic tubing to enable the transportation of each panel to the hanging position.
Mid-process ironing one of the vintage linen panels onto the plastic tubing to prepare for hanging. Before transferring the panel out to the exhibition space the wooden dowelling rod was inserted along the top channel and held in place with masking tape to aid the hanging process.
My partner John and Joanna Kinnersly-Taylor supported me to prepare for the exhibition. They helped to hang the eight vintage linen panels at height. The fishing line was used to attach the panels around the exhibition rods to ensure that they would stand out from the wall so each piece could be walked around and viewed in its entirety. Once hung appropriately the masking tape was removed and the plastic tubing was allowed to fall out as the material was rolled out.
Gillian Morris (2021) Exhibition Preparation- Process of hanging the panels in the exhibition space within the Wasps Exhibition Space at Hanson Street, Dennistoun, Glasgow. “Help me, I’m struggling to want to be here” Mental Health Crisis- A Visual Account of Emotional Distress. 203cm x 274cm Screen-Printed Vintage Linen Bedsheet using intuitive emotional relating with the materials. Various greys, black, sugarplum pink, ruby red and pomegranate printing inks used on vintage dyed grey linen which explored greater emotional arousal.
Initial selection processes concerning which of the samples were to be framed for the exhibition to help demonstrate the creative process, communication of the main themes and narrative
From the many completed samples showcasing emotional crisis those using preferred and specific imagery, layering techniques and colour palette were selected
Morris (2021) Preferred Framed Sampling for Mental Health Crisis- A Visual Account of Emotional Distress. (IKEA White RIBBA Frames A1 Size with white mount card 61 x 90cm)
Morris (2021) Preferred Framed Sampling for Mental Health Crisis- A Visual Account of Emotional Distress. (IKEA White RIBBA Frames A1 Size with white mount card 61 x 90cm)
Morris (2021) Preferred Framed Sampling for Mental Health Crisis- A Visual Account of Emotional Distress. (IKEA White RIBBA Frames A1 Size with white mount card 61 x 90cm)
Six Mounted and Framed Samples on the Wall alongside “I no longer want to live” Mental Health Crisis- A Visual Account of Emotional Distress. 203cm x 274cm Screen-Printed Vintage Linen Bedsheet using intuitive emotional relating with the materials.
Initial selection processes concerning which of the samples were to be framed for the exhibition to help demonstrate the creative process, communication of the main themes and narrative
Morris (2021) Preferred Framed Sampling for Mental Health Recovery- A Visual Account of Emotional Repair. (IKEA White RIBBA Frames A1 Size with white mount card 61 x 90cm)
Morris (2021) Preferred Framed Sampling for Mental Health Recovery- A Visual Account of Emotional Repair. (IKEA White RIBBA Frames A1 Size with white mount card 61 x 90cm)
Morris (2021) Preferred Framed Sampling for Mental Health Recovery- A Visual Account of Emotional Repair. (IKEA White RIBBA Frames A1 Size with white mount card 61 x 90cm)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s