Screen-Printing Preparation- Separation of Mark Making using Black Charcoal and Ink Wash

Mark making with black charcoal and ink wash on rough textured watercolour paper

I continued to experiment with black charcoal and black ink wash on different types of surfaces. I continued to be influenced by my previous artwork using Payne’s grey and yellow ochre watercolours, metallic silver acrylic paint, black ink, pen and charcoal but also felt sufficiently freed up to be led by the experimentation process itself. From a range of experimentation using different qualities of paper and card I preferred the effects produced from using rough textured watercolour paper. The textural surfaces of the rough watercolour paper worked well with the black charcoal and ink wash. The textural qualities of the watercolour paper led readily to expressive mark making.

Mark making with black charcoal and ink wash on rough textured watercolour paper

More specifically I liked the effects of charcoal over wash over the rough watercolour paper, of the ridged and textural effects. Given such experimentation I aim to further explore such textural effects using charcoal and wash. I plan to extend my collection of rough watercolour paper which has been pressed between sheets of textured felt during the drying process. I will use heavier grain for enhanced textural effects which suit bolder and more expressive drawing and painting techniques. Since I plan to undertake a series of screen-printing projects using hand-dyed linen, cotton velvet and silk velvet over the next few weekends I will continue this experimentation process over the next few months.

Mark making with black charcoal and ink wash on rough textured watercolour paper

For the forthcoming screen-printing processes including sampling I have selected some preferred marks using watercolour paper, black charcoal and ink wash. In playing with scale a number of options and possibilities have been identified for screen-printing use to allow for a greater range of mark making, affording enhanced versatility and diversity with pattern and print on textiles.

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